Home

About me

Contact us

Sign guest book

View guest book

Simpul-Simpul / Tali-Temali

 
"Pecinta Alam identik dengan pelestarian alam, tapi nyatanya? justru bertolak belakang...!!!"
 

    

 

Saat ini keberadaan klub Pecinta alam tumbuh subur di bumi pertiwi ini, seperti jamur dimusim hujan. Dengan kondisi alam yang begitu mendukung kegiatan tersebut. Sebuah usaha positif dalam menyalurkan kegiatan tersebut. Namun terbersit ke khawatiran dengan banyaknya klub/kelompok pecinta alam tersebut. Apalagi bila kehadiran klub-klub ini tidak diiringi misi dan visi yang jelas dalam organisasinya. Lihat saja gunung-gunung di Indonesia, contohnya Gede-Pangrango. Begitu kotor dan penuh dengan sampah...!

Mereka yang menamakan dirinya pecinta alam seharusnya menjadi ujung tombak dalam pelestarian alam ini bukan justru sebaliknya. Makna pecinta alam dewasa ini sudah jauh dari makna yang sebenarnya.

Pecinta Alam bukanlah mereka yang yang telah menggapai atap-atap dunia, bukan mereka yang berhasil melakukan expedisi yang berbahaya, bukan pula mereka yang ahli dalam mendaki. Tapi mereka adalah orang-orang yang mau menjaga kebersihan lingkungan dimana mereka berada.

Sudah banyak manusia-manusia yang telah menggapai atap-atap dunia, tapi hanya segelintir orang yang benar-benar sebagai pecinta alam.

Semoga kita termasuk segelintir orang yang peduli dengan alam.

 
 

Bowline

 
Clove Hitch  
Figur of Eight  
Fisherman / Simpul Nelayan  
Lark's Head  
Rolling Hitch  
Round turn and Two half Hitches  
Sheepshank  
Sheet Bend  
Double Sheet Bend  
Left Handed Sheet Bend  
Thief  
Thumb  
Timber Hitch  
     
   
   

 

 

 

 

 

Bowline

  •  A commonly used knot to tie a loop in the end of a rope. It has the advantage of not jamming, compared to some other loop forming knots (for example when using an overhand knot on a large bight to form a loop).
  • Form a small loop (the direction is important), and pass the free end of the knot up through the loop, around behind the standing part of the rope, and back down through the loop.
  • A chant used by many to remember this knot is "The rabbit comes out of the hole, round the tree, and back down the hole again", where the hole is the small loop, and the rabbit is the running end of the rope.
  • In the same way that a Left Handed Sheet bend is a Sheet bend that has the running end of the rope coming out of the wrong side of the knot, a cowboy bowline is a bowline that also has the running end of the rope coming out of the wrong side of the knot. It suffers the same problems as the left handed sheet bend.
  • Tip. Don't be afraid to use this knot to form a loop of any size in rope.
  • Tip. To quickly identify if you have tied the Bowline normal or left handed, check to see that the running end exits the knot on the inside of the loop.
  • Tip. For added security, finish the knot with a stop knot such as a Figure of Eight knot to remove any possibility of the Bowline slipping.
  • Tip. If you use this knot in a man carrying situation - perhaps a rescue where a harness is unavailable - then you MUST use a stop knot as mentioned above.

:: Back To Top ::

 
 

Clove Hitch

  • Use to attach a rope to a pole, this knot provide a quick and secure result. It rarely jams, and can in fact suffer from the hitch unrolling under tension if the pole can turn. Often used to start and finish lashings.
  • With practice, this can be easily tied with one hand - especially useful for sailors!
  • Tip. If you are in a situation where the clove hitch may unroll, add a couple of half hitches with the running end to the standing end of the knot, turning it into a "Clove Hitch and Two Half Hitches"!
  • Tip. When pioneering, use the Round turn and two half hitches to start and finish your lashings instead of the Clove Hitch. It won't unroll, and is easier to finish tying off. It just does not look so neat!

:: Back To Top ::

 

Figur Of Eight

  • A useful "Stop" knot to temporarily bulk out the end of a rope or cord, the finished knot looks like its name. It is superior to using a Thumb Knot, because it does not jam so easily.
  • Tip: The Figure of Eight is useful to temporarily stop the ends of a rope fraying, before it is whipped.
:: Back To Top ::
 

 

Fisherman


  • The Fisherman's knot is used to tie two ropes of equal thickness together. It is used by fishermen to join fishing line, and is very effective with small diameter strings and twines.
  • Tie a Thumb knot, in the running end of the first rope around the second rope. Then tie a thumb knot in the second rope, around the first rope. Note the Thumb knots are tied such they lie snugly against each other when the standing ends are pulled.
  • When tying knots in monofilament line, moisten the line before pulling the knot tight. This helps to stop the line heating up with friction, which weakens it.
:: Back To Top ::

 

Lark's Head

  • The Lark's Head knot is used to loosely attach a rope to a spar or ring. The knot has two redeeming features, it is easy to tie, and it does not jam. However, it will slip fairly easily along the spar, and may slip undone when tied using man made fibre ropes.
  • Tip. This is a knot to be avoided when a secure attachment is required. The Round turn and two half hitches, and the Clove hitch are far more secure.

 

 :: Back To Top ::

 

Rolling Hitch

  • One of the most underated knots in Scouting and Guiding, the Rolling hitch is used to attach one rope to a second, in such a manner that the first rope can be easily slid along the second.
  • The knot can be considered a Clove hitch with an additional turn.
  • When tension is applied and the ropes form a straight line, the rolling hitch will lock onto the first rope. When the tension is released, the hitch can be loosened and slid along the first rope to a new location.
  • The tension must be applied on the side of the knot with the extra turn.
  • Tip. Use this knot if you have a guy rope with no adjuster. Create a loop on the end of a second rope which is slipped over the peg. Use a rolling hitch to attach the second rope to the guyline. Alternatively, take the guyline around the peg and tie the Rolling hitch back onto the standing part of the guyline, above the peg, thus forming an adjustable loop. This is known as the Tautline Hitch in America.
  • Tip. Use this knot when constructing camp gadgets such as a suspended table. A Rolling hitch in each suspension rope will allow easy adjustment and a level table!
  • Tip. When adjustments are complete, lock the rolling hitch into place by using a stop knot such as a Figure of Eight in the first rope, below the Rolling hitch, to stop it slipping.
:: Back To Top ::

 

Round Turn and Two Half Hitches


  • Used to secure a rope to a pole, or to start or finish a lashing. Pass the running end of the rope over the pole twice. Then pass the running end over the standing part of rope, and tuck it back up and under itself, forming a half hitch. Repeat this for a second half hitch.
  • This knot has a redeeming feature - it rarely jams!
  • Tip. Superior to a Clove Hitch for starting and finishing a lashing as the half hitches prevent this knot from unrolling, as they have the effect of locking the knot. The Clove Hitch looks neater (!) but it has a tendancy to unroll, and can be difficult to tie tightly when tying off.

 

 

:: Back To Top ::

 

Sheepshank


  • The Sheepshank is a shortening knot, which enables a rope to be shortened non-destructively.
  • The knot is only really secure under tension, it will fall apart when slack. (See tip below.)
  • Tip. Use up to five half hitches each end of the Sheepshank to make the knot more secure, and for fine tuning the shortening.
  • Tip. Never cut ropes to shorten them! Always use a shortening knot such as the Sheepshank, or coil the excess.

 

 

:: Back To Top ::

 

 

Sheet Bend



  • The Sheetbend is commonly used to tie two ropes of unequal thickness together. The thicker rope of the two is used to form a bight, and the thinner rope is passed up through the bight, around the back of the bight, and then tucked under itself.
  • The knot should be tied with both ends coming off the same side of the bend, as illustrated here. However it can easily be accidentally tied with the ends coming off opposite sides of the bend, when it is known as the Left Handed Sheet Bend. The Left Handed Sheet Bend is to be avoided as it is less secure
  • Tip. If the ropes are of very unequal thickness, or placed under a lot of tension, use a Double Sheetbend.

 

 

:: Back To Top ::

 

 

Double Sheet Bend

  • The Double Sheetbend is a more secure form of the Sheetbend.
  • The thicker rope of the two is used to form a bight, and the thinner rope is passed up through the bight, around the back of the bight, around again before tucking under itself.
  • Tip. It is particularly useful when the thickness of the two ropes varies considerably, or when a more secure Sheetbend is required.

 

 

 

 

:: Back To Top ::

 

 

Left Handed Sheet Bend


  • This knot is a wrongly tied Sheetbend, a very easy mistake to make. The ends of the ropes should both come off the same side of the knot, and NOT off opposite sides as shown here. The knot strength is severely reduced, and this knot should be avoided
  • Tip. Avoid this knot under all circumstances. Always use a Sheetbend.

 

 

 

 

 

:: Back To Top ::

 

 

Thief


  • The Thief knot resembles the Reef knot at a casual glance. Note that the ends of the Thief Knot come off opposite sides of the knot. In the Reef knot, they come off the same sides.
  • However, the Thief knot has no strength whatsoever, and will slip under tension.
  • Tip. Only use this knot for tricks. NEVER use it where life and limb are at risk

 

 

 

 

 

 

:: Back To Top ::

 

 

Thumb


  • This is the simplist knot of all. It is commonly use to temporarily "stop" the end of a fraying rope.
  • The overhand knot is commonly tied in a bight formed at the end of a rope, forming the Overhand Loop.
  • Tip. The Thumbknot jams easily so it is far better to use a Figure of Eight knot to stop the end of a fraying rope.

 

 

 

 

 

:: Back To Top ::

 

 

Timber Hitche


  • Used to attach a rope to a log, or where security is not an issue. This knot tightens under strain, but comes undone extremely easily when the rope is slack.
  • Wrap the rope around the log, then pass the running end around the standing part of the rope. Finally twist the running end around itself three or four times. (Note: this is only shown twice in the animation.)
  • Tip: Jolly useful for dragging logs back to the camp fire!

:: Back To Top ::

 

Hakcipta hijjau@pendakierror.com 2004